Rochelle D. Schwartz-Bloom

Professor in Pharmacology & Cancer Biology

External address: 
B238 LSRC Building, Durham, NC 27710
Internal office address: 
Duke Box 3813, Durham, NC 27710
Phone: 
(919) 684-5181

Dr. Schwartz-Bloom is a co-principal investigator for the National Science Foundation Phase II Noyce Fellowship program.

Overview

The Schwartz-Bloom laboratory has completed 18 years of research investigating novel pharmacologic approaches to prevent neuronal death caused by cerebral ischemia associated with cardiac arrest and stroke. The group studied how GABA neurotransmission dysfunction contributes to the death of hippocampal neurons after ischemia in vivo or in vitro. Dr. Schwartz-Bloom’s research program continues now exclusively in science education, which she started in 1996. With funds provided by the Duke Provost in 2007, Dr. Schwartz-Bloom established Duke Center for Science Education, an umbrella for all Duke-related activities in science education. She coordinates Duke faculty and student interests in curriculum development, research, and outreach activities in science education for the K-16 grades. Dr. Schwartz-Bloom also directs RISE (Raising Interest in Science Education, www.rise.duke.edu), an office within the Department of Pharmacology and Cancer Biology, where she develops and provides novel science education curricular materials in the area of pharmacology to the K-12 and college community. One of the major programs that she developed is the Pharmacology Education Partnership (www.thepepproject.net), a series of pharmacology- and drug abuse-related science education modules for high school biology and chemistry students. Testing of over 15,000 high school students has revealed that student performance in biology and chemistry improves when they use the pharmacology curriculum developed by her team. Dr. Schwartz-Bloom provides several opportunities for Duke Pharmacology graduate students and post-doctoral fellows to obtain experience in teaching.

Education

  • Ph.D., Georgetown University 1983

An Ecosystem Approach to Funding & Scaling the Impact of Innovations in Healthcare awarded by US Agency for International Development (Co Investigator). 2012 to 2022

Duke University Noyce Scholarship - Phase II awarded by National Science Foundation (Co Investigator). 2013 to 2018

Bringing Real Experiments (REX) about Substance Abuse to High School Students awarded by National Institutes of Health (Principal Investigator). 2014 to 2018

Self-Generated Research Experiences to Support Biomedical/Behavioral Research Careers awarded by National Institutes of Health (Co Investigator). 2010 to 2015

Science Education in Health Ed Class: Tobacco and Addiction awarded by National Institutes of Health (Principal Investigator). 2008 to 2014

The Alcohol Pharmacology Education Partnership awarded by National Institutes of Health (Principal Investigator). 2005 to 2012

The Robert Noyce Fellows at Duke University awarded by National Science Foundation (Principal Investigator). 2005 to 2009

The Pharmacology Education Partnership awarded by National Institutes of Health (Principal Investigator). 1997 to 2008

Transient Cerebral Ischemia & GABA Neurotransmission awarded by National Institutes of Health (Principal Investigator). 2000 to 2006

Pages

Lipkus, IM, Schwartz-Bloom, R, Kelley, MJ, and Pan, W. "A preliminary exploration of college smokers' reactions to nicotine dependence genetic susceptibility feedback." Nicotine & tobacco research : official journal of the Society for Research on Nicotine and Tobacco 17.3 (March 2015): 337-343. Full Text

Godin, EA, Wormington, SV, Perez, T, Barger, MM, Snyder, KE, Richman, LS, Schwartz-Bloom, R, and Linnenbrink-Garcia, L. "A Pharmacology-Based Enrichment Program for Undergraduates Promotes Interest in Science." CBE life sciences education 14.4 (January 2015): ar40-. Full Text Open Access Copy

Lipkus, IM, Eissenberg, T, Schwartz-Bloom, RD, Prokhorov, AV, and Levy, J. "Relationships among factual and perceived knowledge of harms of waterpipe tobacco, perceived risk, and desire to quit among college users." J Health Psychol 19.12 (December 2014): 1525-1535. Full Text

Godin, EA, Kwiek, N, Sikes, SS, Halpin, MJ, Weinbaum, CA, Burgette, LF, Reiter, JP, and Schwartz-Bloom, RD. "Alcohol Pharmacology Education Partnership: Using Chemistry and Biology Concepts To Educate High School Students about Alcohol." Journal of chemical education 91.2 (February 2014): 165-172. Full Text

Lipkus, IM, Eissenberg, T, Schwartz Bloom, RD, Prokhorov, AV, and Levy, J. "Affecting perceptions of harm and addiction among college waterpipe tobacco smokers." Nicotine & tobacco research : official journal of the Society for Research on Nicotine and Tobacco 13.7 (July 2011): 599-610. (Academic Article) Full Text

Chen, C-FJ, Jiang, A, Litkowski, E, Elia, AR, Shuen, JA, Xu, K, Bonhivert, A, Hsu-Kim, H, and Schwartz-Bloom, RD. "Females Excelling more in math, engineering, and science (femmes): An after-school STEM program for girls that FOSTERS hands-on learning and Female-to-Female mentorship." Journal of Women and Minorities in Science and Engineering 17.4 (2011): 313-324. Full Text

Shuen, JA, Elia, AR, Xu, K, Chen, CHJ, Jiang, A, Litkowski, E, Bonhivert, A, Hsu Kim, H, and Schwartz Bloom, RD. "Females Excelling More in Math, Engineering, and Science (FEMMES): One-day mentorship program to engage 4th-6th grade girls in STEM activities." Journal of Women and Minorities in Science and Engineering 17.4 (2011): 295-312. (Academic Article)

Schwartz-Bloom, RD, Halpin, MJ, and Reiter, JP. "Teaching high school chemistry in the context of pharmacology helps both teachers and students learn." Journal of Chemical Education 88.6 (2011): 744-750. Full Text

Shuen, JA, Elia, AR, Xu, K, Chen, C-FJ, Jiang, A, Litkowski, E, Bonhivert, A, Hsu-Kim, H, and Schwartz-Bloom, RD. "Femmes: A one-day mentorship program to engage 4th-6th grade girls in stem activities." Journal of Women and Minorities in Science and Engineering 17.4 (2011): 295-312. Full Text

Sikes, SS, and Schwartz-Bloom, RD. "LEAP! Launch into Education About Pharmacology: transforming students into scientists." Mol Interv 9.5 (October 2009): 215-219. Full Text

Pages

Godin, EA, Sikes, SS, Halpin, MJ, Reiter, JP, and Schwartz-Bloom, RD. "THE ALCOHOL PHARMACOLOGY EDUCATION PARTNERSHIP: EDUCATING HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS ABOUT ALCOHOL." June 2012.

Smoking and How it Changes the Brain. Creator, Director, Writer. Smoking in the DiVE (2011)

Abstract

This web-based interactive 3D virtual experience will help students learn how smoking cigarettes changes the brain. Developed using virtual reality software that runs the Duke Immersive Virtual Environment (DiVE) , the program is completely interactive for use online by the general public, including high school students in biology, health education, or even neuroscience.

Travel into the avatar’s brain to the “reward pathway”. There, you will interact with nicotine molecules to learn how smoking changes receptors for nicotine on the neurons that provide pleasurable feelings. You’ll take a ride along the reward pathway..woo-hoo! It’s the next best thing to “being there”.

DiVE into Alcohol. Director, Programmer, Writer. DiVE into Alcohol (2008)

Abstract

This web-based interactive 3D virtual experience will help students learn how alcohol gets absorbed into the body and chemically changed into a toxic substance. Developed using virtual reality software that runs the Duke immersive Virtual Environment (DiVE) , the program is completely interactive for use online by the general public, including high school chemistry & biology, and college chemistry, biology, biochemistry, & organic chemistry.

Travel into the avatar’s body to follow alcohol molecules through the gastrointestinal tract to the liver. There, you can control the chemical reaction called oxidation, moving molecules in 3D space to generate a toxic metabolite. Finally, learn how genetics changes everything! It’s the next best thing to “being there”.

Smoking and How it Changes the Brain. Creator, Director, Writer. Smoking in the DiVE (2011)

Abstract

This web-based interactive 3D virtual experience will help students learn how smoking cigarettes changes the brain. Developed using virtual reality software that runs the Duke Immersive Virtual Environment (DiVE) , the program is completely interactive for use online by the general public, including high school students in biology, health education, or even neuroscience.

Travel into the avatar’s brain to the “reward pathway”. There, you will interact with nicotine molecules to learn how smoking changes receptors for nicotine on the neurons that provide pleasurable feelings. You’ll take a ride along the reward pathway..woo-hoo! It’s the next best thing to “being there”.

DiVE into Alcohol. Director, Programmer, Writer. DiVE into Alcohol (2008)

Abstract

This web-based interactive 3D virtual experience will help students learn how alcohol gets absorbed into the body and chemically changed into a toxic substance. Developed using virtual reality software that runs the Duke immersive Virtual Environment (DiVE) , the program is completely interactive for use online by the general public, including high school chemistry & biology, and college chemistry, biology, biochemistry, & organic chemistry.

Travel into the avatar’s body to follow alcohol molecules through the gastrointestinal tract to the liver. There, you can control the chemical reaction called oxidation, moving molecules in 3D space to generate a toxic metabolite. Finally, learn how genetics changes everything! It’s the next best thing to “being there”.

Smoking and How it Changes the Brain. Creator, Director, Writer. Smoking in the DiVE (2011)

Abstract

This web-based interactive 3D virtual experience will help students learn how smoking cigarettes changes the brain. Developed using virtual reality software that runs the Duke Immersive Virtual Environment (DiVE) , the program is completely interactive for use online by the general public, including high school students in biology, health education, or even neuroscience.

Travel into the avatar’s brain to the “reward pathway”. There, you will interact with nicotine molecules to learn how smoking changes receptors for nicotine on the neurons that provide pleasurable feelings. You’ll take a ride along the reward pathway..woo-hoo! It’s the next best thing to “being there”.

DiVE into Alcohol. Director, Programmer, Writer. DiVE into Alcohol (2008)

Abstract

This web-based interactive 3D virtual experience will help students learn how alcohol gets absorbed into the body and chemically changed into a toxic substance. Developed using virtual reality software that runs the Duke immersive Virtual Environment (DiVE) , the program is completely interactive for use online by the general public, including high school chemistry & biology, and college chemistry, biology, biochemistry, & organic chemistry.

Travel into the avatar’s body to follow alcohol molecules through the gastrointestinal tract to the liver. There, you can control the chemical reaction called oxidation, moving molecules in 3D space to generate a toxic metabolite. Finally, learn how genetics changes everything! It’s the next best thing to “being there”.