MAT Faculty

MAT Faculty

 

Ronda Bullock

English Subject Area Methods Instructor
MAT Program University Supervisor

ronda.bullock@duke.edu

A favorite quote about education:

"The only way to know is to walk, then learn, then grow." - Lauryn Hill

A favorite book about education:

Pedagogy of the Oppressed by Paulo Freire

What excites you the most about preparing teachers/ teacher preparation?:

It's always exciting to witness the moments where student teachers see things that they had not seen before.  I'm specifically referencing moments where students begin to understand how power, race, gender, and class intersect with the educational system.

 

 

Kisha Daniels

Educating Adolescents Instructor

kisha.daniels@duke.edu

A favorite quote about education:

"A leader takes people where they want to go. A great leader takes people where they don’t necessarily want to go, but ought to be."  – Rosalynn Carter, former First Lady, USA

What excites you the most about preparing teachers/ teacher preparation?:

It is important to ensure that students who want to be teachers are not only prepared in their knowledge, skills and dispositions, but that they are also fully aware of the realities of teaching. It is for this reason that I feel that it is important for pre-service teachers to be pushed out of their comfort zones.  It is through these experiences that I tap into and get the best out of students. I embody my favorite quote for this reason.  

Last great read (about education)::

Dream Hoarders: How the American Upper Middle Class Is Leaving Everyone Else in the Dust, Why That Is a Problem, and What to Do About It by Richard Reeves
"It is now conventional wisdom to focus on the wealth of the top 1 percent—especially the top 0.01 percent—and how the ultra-rich are concentrating income and prosperity while incomes for most other Americans are stagnant. But the most important, consequential, and widening gap in American society is between the upper middle class and everyone else."  This book resonated with me as a result of the conversations that the author has around how the widening economic gap has historically impacted education.  It highlights frightening disparities and discrepancies that in order to impact positive change in systemic areas, will involve succinct policy and personal changes.  Additionally, it really takes a stab at making the reader look inward to how they may or may not be contributing to the current issues.  I loved this book so much, that it became essential reading in my EDU 101- Foundations of Education course!  

Last great read (not about education)::

During the holiday break, I had time to read a book in my favorite genre- Historical Non-Fiction.  Written by a History professor (Karen Cox) who teaches at UNC-Charlotte, Goat Castle: A True Story of Murder, Race and the Gothic South is a "strange, fascinating, and sobering, story of a local Natchez, MS feud, a killing, an investigation, and a trial, showing how a true crime tale of fallen southern grandeur and murder obscured an all too familiar story of racial injustice." While it may sound macabre, the crime was really a backdrop for a story that highlights race relations. The book spends a considerable amount of time discussing the aristocracy of the old south and the historical traditions that led to the outcome and ramifications of the crime.  It is a thoughtfully written story that reminds us of how history always repeats itself when lessons are not learned.  It is a great read and very much worth your time!

 

Christine Fierro

Math Subject Area Methods Instructor

christine.fierro@dpsnc.net

 

 

 

 

Cheryl Fuller

MAT Program University Supervisor

cheryl.fuller@duke.edu

A favorite quote about education:

"Prepare the child for the path, not the path for the child."

I believe this quote speaks to our roll as educators in preparing students adequately for whatever challenges they will face in the world.  Because the world changes faster than we are able to change ourselves, it is necessary for us to teach children skills that can be used in all paths they may travel: the ability to think critically and solve problems; skills to collaborate and communicate effectively with those who are like us and those who are different from us; the ability to be creative and flexible in our ever changing world. I am passionate about supporting those people who are courageous in wanting to be the teachers of the children who are seeking so much from us. Teaching at this time has never been more challenging and I am honored to have the opportunity to help prepare teachers for those challenges. As a life-long learner myself, I love the experience of teaching and learning and seek to share that with all student teacher candidates!

 

 
 

 

 

Mika Hunter Twietmeyer

Science Subject Area Methods Instructor
Science Teacher at Riverside High School
MAT Program Mentor Teacher

mikajhunter@gmail.com

A favorite quote about education:

"Without math and science you are disadvantaged from the start."

What excites you the most about preparing teachers/ teacher preparation?:

What excites you the most about preparing teachers / teacher preparation - I enjoy the excitement and creativity that interns bring to the classroom and the lessons they create. I enjoy watching them  develop their craft. And, alongside them, I get to reflect on my craft and learn alongside them.  And, I think It's important for students to see that adults want to enter the education profession and that it is a profession where there are internships and apprenticeships so that the skills can be learned. 

 

 

Naomi Kraut

Director, Master of Arts in Teaching Program

naomi.kraut@duke.edu

A favorite quote about education:

“What good questions did you ask today?”

A favorite book about education:

For White Folks Who Teach in the Hood and the Rest of Y’all, Too by Christopher Emdin

What excites you the most about preparing teachers/ teacher preparation?:

The relationships that student teachers foster with their students are so caring and meaningful. 

 

Scott Morrison

Social Studies Subject Area Methods Instructor

scott.morrison@duke.edu

A favorite quote about education:

 "Culturally relevant pedagogy is premised on three things. One, a laser-like focus on student learning. Two, an attempt to develop in all students cultural competence. What I mean by that is you help kids understand assets that are part of their own culture, while simultaneously helping them become fluent in at least one more culture. So it would mean youngsters of color have to learn the mainstream culture, but at the same moment youngsters in the mainstream need to learn some other cultures. Youngsters of color also need to value the culture they have. And the third piece is what I call socio-political consciousness. Kids say, 'Why do we have to learn this?' And what I’m saying is a culturally relevant teacher has thought about this and has answers for why a subject or topic is important.” - Gloria Ladson-Billings

Favorite books about education:

Holler if You Hear Me: The Education of a Teacher and His Students by Gregory Michie 
Lost at School: Why Our Kids with Behavioral Challenges are Falling Through the Cracks and How We Can Help Them by Ross Greene
Teaching Community: A Pedagogy of Hope by bell hooks.

 

 

Susan Wynn

Chair, Program in Education

susan.wynn@duke.edu

A favorite quote about education:

School “reformers” should be guided by John Dewey’s famous quote: “What the best and wisest parent wants for his [and her} own child, that must the community want for all of its children. Any other ideal for our schools is narrow and unlovely; acted upon , it destroys our democracy.”

Favorite books about education:

A book I read earlier this semester was Diane Ravitch’s Reign of Error: The Hoax of the Privatization Movement and the Danger to America’s Public Schools. Published in 2013 Ravitch gets right to the point, which is basically the concerted effort of many politicians, major corporations, billionaires and major foundations to systematically  dismantle public schools in the US, and, even worse, to continue down the current path of segregated, underfunded schools for a large percentage of students and families.
 
This book is the follow-up to Ravitch’s The Death and Life of the Great American School System, a text that quickly became a “must read” for educators, policy-makers, parents and anyone else who believes in the promise of public education. If I had to recommend only one of these two books, I recommend Reign Of Error, primarily because of the author’s  focus on “corporate reformers” who say they want to improve public schools but instead concentrate their efforts (and funding) on entrepreneurs who definitely favor a competitive, market-based school choice model.

 
 

 

Faculty Advisors

 

Thomas J. Ferraro

Frances Hill Fox Professor of English

ferraro@duke.edu

 

Adriane Lentz-Smith

Associate Professor, Department of History

adriane.lentz-smith@duke.edu

 

Ezra Miller

Professor of Mathematics

ezra.miller@duke.edu

 

Rochelle D. Schwartz-Bloom

Professor in Pharmacology & Cancer Biology

schwartz.bloom@duke.edu

 

Administrative Support

Joanna Middleton

Staff Assistant, Duke MAT Program

joanna.middleton@duke.edu